Tag Archives: Down the Frozen River

Down the Frozen River Podcast #68- The Jagr Episode

After taking a forced hiatus because SoundCloud is falling from the sky and we moved our podcast to Libsyn, Nick and Connor discuss what was going on in the hockey world around July 21st. At the time of this recording, Jaromir Jagr was still unsigned, arbitration was going on, the Carolina Hurricanes found a potential buyer and Colton Parayko signed a 5-year extension with the St. Louis Blues.

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Down the Frozen River Podcast #67- Offseason Extensions

Haim, Wimbledon, baseball and everything but hockey. The Original Trio explore many facets of the extensions that have been signed by players over the last couple of weeks including Carey Price, Connor McDavid and Martin Jones, as well as breakdown the Arizona Coyotes hiring of Rick Tocchet as head coach.

Down the Frozen River Podcast #66- Winners, Losers and Hurrhawks

Entering the fifth day of free agency in the 2017 offseason, The Original Trio pick winners and losers of free agency, trades made since July 1st and predict the 2017-2018 season standings for all 31 NHL teams. Also, Connor McDavid signed his 8-year, $12.5 million AAV extension with the Edmonton Oilers after we finished recording.

Down the Frozen River Podcast #65-Overpay Players 2K17

The Original Trio recap the Expansion Draft, Entry Draft and previous week in NHL news, as well as preview this year’s free agency scene. Colby rants about Montreal’s defense. Jimmy Hayes was bought out after we finished recording. The Oilers are about to pay way too much money (and they aren’t even signing a free agent to do so).

Down the Frozen River Podcast #64– Vegas, adidas and awardus

The Original Trio address a variety of topics from the last week around the NHL, including the Jonathan Drouin trade, the Mike Smith trade, the Nathan Beaulieu trade, Marian Hossa‘s skin disorder, awards, new adidas jerseys, Vegas and more. Also discussed, Brass Bonanza and the amazing article The Hockey Writer’s Jeff Yerger wrote on Wednesday. This week’s episode contains part of “Tequila” from the album Color in Music 1 by Jacques Ysaye and His Orchestra.

Completely Biased DTFR Awards for Our Egos (Part Two)

The NHL’s annual awards ceremony is in a week, so to help kick off all of the excitement surrounding the primetime event in Las Vegas, I present to you our annual in-house awards. These things will never gather dust as they don’t even exist to begin with, so nobody has to worry about clogging up shelf space for Down the Frozen River participation trophies.

We weren’t able to afford Joe Manganiello’s hosting services, but if you’re a fan of said actor, don’t fret, because he is hosting this year’s NHL Awards Ceremony on NBCSN next Wednesday (June 21st) at 8 p.m. ET.

 

Simply Existed Award— presented by me to all of our members for simply existing– Frank Fanelli, Jordan Dettrow, Connor Keith and Colby Kephart

All of these people helped make Down the Frozen River exist over the past season.

Hot Air Award– presented by me to our crew member with the most bold predictions and hot takes this season on the Down the Frozen River Podcast— Colby Kephart

Colby became the two-time defending recipient of this award for having gone on many rants over the course of the third season of the Down the Frozen River Podcast.

Content-King Award— presented by me to our crew member with the most content/best quality content on a consistent basis this season– Connor Keith

For the second year in a row, Connor provided the best content on the site with his continued Game of the Day column. Connor also wrote some great stuff on panthers.com this season for the NFL’s Carolina Panthers, if you’re interested.

The “Technically Can’t Give Yourself an Award” Award— presented by me to myself so I can feel included too– Nick Lanciani

While I wasn’t always able to provide the most coverage, I managed to stick to a (mostly) routine schedule of hosting the Down the Frozen River Podcast, write a few good things here and there and spent a good portion of the season at TD Garden. Pending career opportunities, I may or may not produce more thoughts on the blog in the near future.

Thanks to everyone– yes, that includes you, the reader– who made the 2016-2017 NHL season the best one yet! Be sure to tune in to our offseason content and keep in touch for all of our latest news, notes and potential career moves.

Down the Frozen River Podcast #63– We Should Totally Be GMs

The Original Trio wraps up this year’s Stanley Cup Final takes and final thoughts. Colby, Connor and Nick make their Vegas Golden Knights predictions known with the official Down the Frozen River mock 2017 NHL Expansion Draft. Also, Florida hired a new head coach and Colby ranted about Sidney Crosby.

Down the Frozen River Podcast #62– The Original Three

The Original Trio discusses the ongoing Stanley Cup Final and all of Smashville’s boisterous madness. Additionally discussed, delay of game penalties, Pekka Rinne, Matthew Murray, Marc-Andre Fleury, the latest shockwave out of Seattle and the upcoming Expansion Draft procedure for the Vegas Golden Knights.

Down the Frozen River Podcast #61– Fight Coach

Nick and Connor discuss the ongoing 2017 Stanley Cup Final matchup between the Pittsburgh Penguins and the Nashville Predators, as well as Conn Smythe picks, St. Louis’s surprising coaching moves and more. Also professed, Connor’s love for tennis.

Penguins trounce Predators 5-3 in Game 1

2017 Stanley Cup Final– Game One Recap

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Comebacks are a bit of Peter Laviolette’s specialty. That is until Monday night when Nashville Predators head coach, Laviolette, faced fellow Massachusetts native and Pittsburgh Penguins head coach, Mike Sullivan in Game 1 of the 2017 Stanley Cup Final.

Sullivan coaxed his Penguins to the 5-3 victory on home ice— staving off a looming Predators comeback at PPG Paints Arena.

Jake Guentzel scored the game winning goal late in the 3rd period before Nick Bonino added an empty net goal for good measure, securing the win for Pittsburgh goaltender Matthew Murray.

Murray made 23 saves on 26 shots against for an .885 save percentage in the win, while Nashville’s Pekka Rinne stopped 7 out of 11 shots faced for a .636 SV% in the loss.

This year’s Stanley Cup Final begins with controversy, though of a different kind from what you’re probably thinking about (a borderline hit, a blown call or whatever). No, this year’s Stanley Cup Final began with a coach’s challenge that drastically turned the momentum of Game 1 on its side.

P.K. Subban thought he had scored his 3rd goal of the 2017 Stanley Cup Playoffs early in the 1st period, but after Sullivan challenged the call on the ice, the refs determined that prior to the puck entering the net, the Predators had entered the zone offside.

The review lasted 4:12 and was the 19th coach’s challenge of the 2017 postseason. It was only the 5th to result in the call on the ice being overturned.

Sullivan, of note, is 2-for-2 in the successful outcome of having utilized his coach’s challenge this postseason.

With 6:10 to go in the 1st period, Calle Jarnkrok and James Neal took coinciding minor penalties for interference and cross checking, respectively, resulting in a 5-on-3 power play for the Penguins.

It didn’t take long for Pittsburgh to capitalize on the two man advantage, as Evgeni Malkin (8) opened up scoring on a power play goal. Trevor Daley (3) and Sidney Crosby (14) assisted the goal that made it 1-0 Penguins.

Conor Sheary (1) followed suit with a goal of his own less than a minute later on a tremendous no look pass from Chris Kunitz. Sheary’s one timer goal from the side of the net made it a 2-0 game and was assisted by Kunitz (4) and Crosby (15).

Bonino (3) capped off the three goal 1st period for Pittsburgh, scoring his first of two goals on the night with 17 seconds left in the period after throwing a shot near Nashville’s goal before it deflected off of Predators defenseman, Mattias Ekholm, and in. Brian Dumoulin (3) collected the only assist on Bonino’s goal.

After 20 minutes of play, the Penguins led 3-0 on the scoreboard, while the Predators led in just about every other category, including shots on goal (11-8).

Nashville was unsuccessful on their first power play opportunity of the night almost four minutes into the 2nd period, but they wouldn’t be fooled again for the rest of the night on the man advantage.

Almost a minute after the Penguins killed off Olli Maatta’s interference minor, Ian Cole was sent to the penalty box for roughing Jarnkrok after a stoppage in play.

With Viktor Arvidsson screening Pittsburgh’s net minder, Ryan Ellis (5) unloaded a shot past Murray with 18 seconds left on the ensuing power play and cut the lead to two. Subban (9) and Mike Fisher (1) recorded the assists on the power play goal, which made it 3-1. Fisher’s assist snapped a career worst 16-games without a point in the playoffs.

Entering the 2nd intermission, the Predators trailed 3-1 despite outshooting the Penguins 20-8 in the game and 9-0 in the 2nd period alone. That’s right, Pittsburgh failed to record a shot on goal in the 2nd period. Nashville became the first team to hold an opponent to 0 shots on goal in a period in a Stanley Cup Final game since the NHL officially began tracking the stat in the 1957-1958 season.

Mounting a comeback effort in the 3rd period, Colton Sissons (6) redirected a shot behind Murray on a power play with 9:54 to go in regulation. Roman Josi found a loose puck as a result of a botched pass attempt from Jarnkrok and fired the puck on goal after Nashville won the offensive zone face-off on a power play, thanks to Malkin’s slashing minor against Subban. Josi (6) and Jarnkrok (3) were credited with the primary and secondary assists.

Trailing by a goal, the last thing the Preds wanted to do was take a stupid penalty. Thankfully, the Penguins weren’t able to convert on Subban’s delay of game minor penalty for sending the puck over the glass.

Shortly after killing off Subban’s penalty, Frederick Gaudreau (1) notched his first career Stanley Cup Playoff goal and tied the game, 3-3, with 6:31 to go in regulation.

The assists on Gaudreau’s goal went to Austin Watson (3) and Fisher (2).

Exactly 37 minutes after Bonino made it a 3-0 game, the Pittsburgh Penguins recorded their 9th shot on goal. And it wasn’t just any shot from the Pens. It was also a goal, this time on a wrist shot from the rookie, Guentzel (10) with 3:17 to go in the 3rd period. Again, that’s two shots in a span of 37 minutes between the 1st period and the 3rd period (and both shots were goals).

Matt Cullen (6) and Justin Schultz (8) picked up the assists on Guentzel’s game winning goal that had made it a 4-3 game.

Prior to becoming the hero of Game 1, Guentzel had “been getting really frustrated lately” as a result of his recent point skid— or more accurately, his recent goal skid— which put him in the fourth line spot that he was playing on Monday night, per our in house Penguins beat Down the Frozen River contributor, Connor Keith.

Finally, Bonino (4) doused the hopes of yet another rallying effort by Nashville with an empty net goal at 18:58 of the 3rd period. Kunitz (5) had the only assist on the goal that made it an untouchable 5-3 game.

At the final horn, the Penguins held on to win Game 1, despite trailing in nearly every important statistical category not including the final score. Nashville outshot Pittsburgh 26-12, led in blocked shots, 14-9, and hits, 37-31. The Penguins dominated the face-off dot on the night winning 58% of face-offs taken.

Pittsburgh finished the night 1/3 on the power play, while Nashville had marginally better success, converting on two of their three (2/3) man advantage opportunities on Monday.

The Penguins take a 1-0 series lead heading into Wednesday night for Game 2 of the 2017 Stanley Cup Final on home ice. Puck drop at PPG Paints Arena is scheduled for a little after 8 p.m. ET and viewers in the United States can tune in to NBCSN for coverage, while Canadian viewers have their choice of CBC, SN or TVA Sports.